Tackling Food Fraud through supply chain resilience

Food Fraud is committed when food is deliberately placed on the market for financial gain, with the intention of deceiving the consumer. It was highlighted in the Elliott Report as the single biggest risk in contamination of modern food supply chains.

Food authenticity is constantly under the spotlight, and gaining rapid interest as an emerging risk given the increasingly global and complex nature of food supply chains.

No matter how simple or complex, supply chains need to be adequately managed in order to meet the expectations for both consumers and customers alike.

Irrespective of size, food fraud can tarnish the entire industry. With tougher penalties being put into place businesses have to work alongside industry standards to maintain the assurance and integrity of their products and supply chains.

Fraud incidences are not only a financial crime but real food safety risks. Food traceability systems enable the recall of unsafe food from the market. The aim is to prevent consumer exposure to harmful food. Should such food make it to market, it’s the strength of food traceability systems that will work to mitigate the risk and enable the necessary parties to react quickly, recalling the affected products and minimising potential damage to consumers.

With stiffer penalties comes clearer guidance. Thanks to the BRC introducing audits against Issue 7 in July 2015, achieving and maintaining quality and safety will strengthen food safety. In turn this helps to grow respect within the industry

As the food and beverage industry continuously evolves to fullfill the needs and requirements of consumers and customers alike, it seems that clear supply chains may become the rule rather than the exception.

Stay one step ahead and gather real-time data and horizon scan for substantial changes in the supply chain through our collaborative network – AUTHENTICATE PYRAMID.

Food authenticity is constantly under the spotlight, and gaining rapid interest as an emerging risk given the increasingly global and complex nature of food supply chains

Posted by: Authenticate 15/04/2015