Are you ready for PAS 96?

Following the European horsemeat incident in 2013, avoidance of food fraud, defence of reputation and product authenticity and ways of ensuring them, are hot topic of conversation.

Food safety management systems have been present within the food industry for years. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) is often used within these systems and the principals are accepted globally. These principals have worked for accidental contamination, they have not routinely been used however to detect or mitigate deliberate attacks on a system or process.

Most commonly these deliberate attacks have been directed towards deliberate contamination or fraud. Fraud incidences are not only a financial crime but real food safety risks. Furthermore with such deliberate attacks, come huge implications towards a business’s reputation.

PAS 96 has been designed with the intention of ‘guiding food business managers through approaches and procedures to improve the resilience of supply chains to fraud or other forms of attack’.

Together with the introduction of BRC7 and the Global Food Safety initiative to make food fraud mitigation an integral part of a company’s food safety management system, it is hoped that PAS 96 can aim to assure the authenticity of food, and protect the integrity of the food supply chain by minimising the risk of an attack.

Supply chains are at the core of this new requirements but are you ready for PAS 96 and do you really know your supply chain well enough to pinpoint food fraud?

Vulnerability Assessments

Companies have been called upon to perform a vulnerability assessment as part of their broader risk management processes, and directly address potential risks to safety, authenticity, legality and quality of the final product. Questions companies need to answer include:

  • Where do we find accurate, reliable information?
  • How do we get the information we need from our suppliers, especially if there are many?
  • How do we ensure we have examined every area of concern?

In order to ensure a secure food supply chain, there needs to be collaboration and true transparency throughout.

The majority of food fraud is committed due to weakness in the supply chain. Stakeholders need to unite, collaborate, and maintain reputation through true transparency, thus upholding the positive status of the food industry as a whole.

For those seeking to implement a robust food defence program in order to comply with the PAS 96 requirements and to be able to fully map your supply chain find out more with Authenticate Pyramid, helping to ensure your business complies with the new requirements, in an intelligent, live environment.

PAS 96 has been designed with the intention of ‘guiding food business managers through approaches and procedures to improve the resilience of supply chains to fraud or other forms of attack’

Posted by: Authenticate 23/04/2015